List of names

List of names

  • By Letter : A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
  • By Gender : Masculine Feminine Unisex
  • By Usage :
EA m Semitic Mythology
Meaning unknown, perhaps from Sumerian meaning "house of water", or perhaps of Akkadian or Hurrian origin. This was the Akkadian, Assyrian, Hurrian and Babylonian name of the Sumerian water god Enki.
EA f Swedish , Danish , Norwegian
Short form of names ending in ea.
ÉABHA f Irish
Irish form of EVE.
EACHANN m Scottish , Irish
Means "brown horse" from Gaelic each "horse" and donn "brown". It was sometimes Anglicized as Hector.
EADAN f Irish
Modern form of ÉTAÍN.
ÉADAOIN f Irish
Modern form of ÉTAÍN.
EADBERHT m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and beorht "bright". This was the name of an 8th-century king of Northumbria and three kings of Kent.
EADBHÁRD m Irish
Irish form of EDWARD.
EADBURG f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and burg "fortress".
EADBURGA f Anglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Variant of EADBURG.
EADGAR m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDGAR.
EADGYÐ f Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDITH.
EADMUND m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDMUND.
EADRIC m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDRIC.
EADWEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDWARD.
EADWIG m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wig "war". This was the name of a Saxon king of England in the 10th century. The name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
EADWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDWIN.
EADWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wulf "wolf". This name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
EALAIR m Scottish
Scottish Gaelic form of HILARY.
EALASAID f Scottish
Scottish Gaelic form of ELIZABETH.
EALDGYÐ f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eald "old" and gyð "battle".
EALDRÆD m Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements eald "old" and ræd "counsel". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
EALDWINE m Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements eald "old" and wine "friend". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
EALHHERE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ealh "temple" and here "army".
EALHSTAN m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ealh "temple" combined with stan "stone".